Bloomberg reports on slowing U.S. growth as trade wars weigh on businesses [Yahoo News, Bloomberg; July 26, 2019]

Windstream’s dispute with its REIT spinoff Uniti heats up, as Windstream seeks to recharacterize its $650 million-per-year lease agreement with Uniti as a disguised financing [Law360; July 25, 2019]

Virginia congressman’s bill on small business bankruptcy reform

Could the US already be in a recession?  [USA Today; June 25, 2019]

Puerto Rico’s Financial Oversight and Management Board proposes bankruptcy plan framework that would cut debt payments by half over the next 30 years [CNBC; June 16, 2019]

As part of proposed agreement between CFPB, attorneys general from 43 states and defunct for-profit

Yesterday, in an 8-1 decision, the US Supreme Court held in Mission Product Holdings, Inc. v. Tempnology, LLC1 that under Section 365 of the Bankruptcy Code, a debtor-licensor’s rejection of a trademark license agreement does not terminate the rights of the licensee to continue using the trademark where those rights would otherwise survive the licensor’s breach of the agreement under non-bankruptcy law.2  The Tempnology decision resolves the most significant unanswered question regarding the treatment of trademark licenses in bankruptcy.

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