What We’re Reading This Week

Reuters interviews Representative Cheri Bustos with respect to a bill she proposed last week, which would prevent executives of bankrupt companies who make more than $250,000 per year from receiving bonuses during or in the six months before a bankruptcy.  [Reuters; October 19, 2021]

CNBC reports on supply chain issues exacerbated by panic ordering from

According to Bloomberg’s U.S. Bankruptcy Tracker, the amount of distressed bonds and loans traded in U.S. markets had the biggest weekly boost of this year, with distressed debt in the telecommunications and oil and gas industries driving the jump. [Bloomberg, Sept. 28, 2021]

The Wall Street Journal discusses a report issued by the Government

Bloomberg Law discusses pending petitions for certiorari seeking the U.S. Supreme Court’s review of lower courts’ application of the “equitable mootness” doctrine, which places significant limits on dissenting parties ability to appeal from orders confirming Chapter 11 plans of reorganization.   One such petition arises out of the Nuverra Environmental Solutions case, which we previously discussed

Law360 reported that the U.S. Trustee’s Office filed a motion opposing a “death trap” provision contained in Avianca Holdings’ Chapter 11 plan of reorganization. In bankruptcy, so-called “death trap” provisions reward classes of creditors for voting in favor of plans of reorganization with higher payouts as an incentive for them to vote to accept a

The Wall Street Journal reports on bond managers’ continued chase for yield, in the continuing, historically low-rate environment, in which yields on even junk bonds have reached record lows not seen in over 30 years. In particular, the Journal notes that some fund managers have even started investing in unrated, illiquid bonds, increasing the risk

The Wall Street Journal reports on Purdue Pharma’s continuing confirmation hearing covering the company’s proposed reorganization plan centered around a $4.5 billion settlement with its founders, the Sackler family.  Currently, the Sackler family is named in civil litigation which alleges that the family knowingly fueled opioid addiction through the marketing of OxyContin, an opioid painkiller.

The Wall Street Journal reports on OxyContin-manufacturer Purdue Pharma LP’s efforts to defend its proposed chapter 11 plan including its proposed multibillion-dollar settlement with the Sackler family, Purdue’s former owners.  The confirmation hearing on Purdue’s proposed plan is set to begin on Thursday, August 12th.  The plan is supported by the unsecured creditors’

Bloomberg reports that the decrease in large U.S. bankruptcy filings may be attributable in part to the use of distressed exchanges in which creditors accept discounts on their debt in exchange for better claims on a borrower’s assets, a later maturity, or both.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Senator Elizabeth Warren plans to introduce